The Carseat in the River: Part Two

The Carseat
in the River: Part Two

For
a little while, we were quiet, digging into our food: a salad for me, and a
burger for Luna. She always craved comfort food after a long day or night at
the office, and I could hardly blame her.

But
I couldn’t focus on my food; I chewed mechanically, not tasting a bite. But it
made me feel more awake. The coffee was the real lifesaver, though. It gave me
something to do with my hands.

“I
know you’re dying from your questions,” Luna said at last, smiling at me
grimly. She wiped her mouth and set her napkin beside her plate. “So why don’t
you have at it?”

“I
wanted you to eat first, at least,” I said indignantly, frowning at her over
the rim of my mug.

She
looked like shit; she was pale under her olive skin, and dark circles stood out
prominently under her eyes. She hadn’t even changed out of the clothes she’d
worn to work the night before: a crumpled black shirt and high-waisted jeans,
and worn gray high-tops. Her hair was gathered in a high ponytail.

“What’s
got you so concerned about this?” Luna asked, refusing to be diverted from the
conversation.

“I
just have a bad feeling. I can’t really explain it,” I said, shrugging it off.

But
I could feel her scrutiny regardless.

“What
kind of bad feeling?” She asked, and relief made my stomach unclench slightly.

If
I’d been talking to anyone else on the force, I’d been branded as
overemotional. Hysterical. Told to call my kids, check on them, return to my
husband and take a few days off.

But
I should’ve known better, with Luna. She listened to me, cared about me, and
cops were taught to go with their gut feeling, but only if they had hard
evidence to back it up.

“I
just have a feeling that this one isn’t going to be clear-cut. I can’t explain
it. But when I saw it on the news…”

She
frowned at me thoughtfully, waiting for me to finish.

“This
one is gonna be rough, Lunes.”

She
finished off her coffee and asked for another cup. I got the feeling that she
was preparing herself for what she was about to say next.

When
the waitress turned away to get us our refills, she frowned at me; I could tell
that she had the same feeling as I about this.

“There’s
not a lot to go on, as I said. They just fished the car seat out of the
marshes, and much of the physical evidence was destroyed as a result.”

Of
course, I’d guessed this much, but said nothing.

“We’re
going to be conducting a search tomorrow morning,” She murmured quietly, making
sure to keep her voice down; the town busybodies didn’t need any concrete
reason to scare people.

Fear
was something that spread like wildfire, especially in a small town such as
this one, and the flames were already beginning, fueled by rumor and lies.

“The
chief said that he didn’t want you on the case, Ells,” Luna murmured, and her
eyes flashed. “He said that you always involve yourself way too much.”

That
arrogant son of a bitch, I thought, my heart sinking to my toes.

It
was almost as if our boss saw through me, to my tender core, and used all of my
insecurities, as a woman and a human being, against me.

“Well,
fuck him. He has no idea what he’s talking about,” I spat, and blushed when the
waitress returned to the table, setting down our mugs of coffee.

Besides,
it was too late. I had a personal stake in this, and I couldn’t just forget it.
Even if I had to ask Luna to keep me informed, I would get to the bottom of
this, even if I had to do it on my own.

**