Category: library loans

Title: Dark and Deepest Red

Author: Anna-Marie McLemore

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Historical Fiction/Romance

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Anna-Marie McLemore has been one of my favorite authors, ever since I read her debut novel, The Weight of Feathers. I’ve read all but one of the books she’s written, but this one might well be my very favorite. Full of lush, gorgeous prose, this book is actually two stories in one. It goes back and forth in time in Strasbourg, France. In 1518, Lavinia and her family, of Romani descent, are blamed for a mysterious plague that makes men and women dance, until they, quite literally, fall down dead. As rumors of witchcraft ensue, Lala must count on every one of her wits to write her own story. 500 years later, Emil, Lala’s descendant, finds himself lost in his own history. But Rosella Oliva’s family, known and renowned shoemakers, have always had a special way with shoes. When Rosella fixes red a pair of shoes that her own grandmother destroyed to spite a jealous, angry customer, they seal themselves to her feet. Drawn to Emil for her own reasons and his history, the two must solve a mystery that intertwines their lives over five centuries.

               I loved this book; it’s definitely a contender for one of my favorite books of 2020. It might be my favorite in McLemore’s entire body of work. I love fairy tale retellings, but I especially adored the way that the story used Hans Christian Anderson’s ‘The Red Shoes’ for its backbone and basis. The prose was gorgeous, lush; more than once, I found myself going back and rereading lines. The pacing was breakneck, and though it took me a little getting used to, the going back and forth, it was so smooth as the book went on. One of my favorite parts of this novel was the real historical fact that the author used to frame her story. (A dancing plague actually did happen in the little French town of Strasbourg!) But I loved the characters, first and foremost, especially Emil and Rosella. I felt like they were sitting in my living room, telling me their magical, dark and bloody tale. I loved the setting of medieval and modern France; I felt like I could taste the magic in the Olivas’ family, and smell the sharp, bitter scent of Emil’s chemicals and compounds. This book might be one of my favorites of 2020, and I can’t wait to see what masterpiece she pens next! The bottom line: Gorgeous, dark, beautiful and tender, I loved Dark and Deepest Red! Next on deck: 19 Love Songs by David Levithan!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/04/dark-and-deepest-red-by-anna-marie.html

Title: Not So Pure and Simple

Author: Lamar Giles

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I
borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               So,
since the coronavirus has come to pandemic status, I’ve been on lockdown for
about a week and a half now; none of my family has left the house, aside from
work. I’ve been trying to keep busy, writing, working, reading, and other
leisure activities. I decided to tackle my library books, and I’m also rereading
my Harry Potter illustrated editions, because I need something to maintain my
sanity and mental health. Practice social distancing, kids, stay inside as much
as you can, but don’t forget to get fresh air! When I finished Salvaged, I
moved on to Not So Pure and Simple. Lamar Giles is one of my favorite authors,
so I’ve been looking forward to it since before it came out. And this book
might be my favorite of all of his books! I loved the way the book was from a
male point of view, and how Giles examined masculinity. This book should be
required reading for everyone, regardless of age. I loved it. It was funny,
honest, thoughtful, and topical. This book is one of my favorites of 2020; I
loved it so much. Easily my favorite of all of Giles’ work!

               Delbert
‘Del’ Rainey has had it bad for his gorgeous classmate, Keira Westing, since
they were in kindergarten. So, when the boyfriend spot opens up, Del quickly
starts angling for the role, even signing himself up for a Purity Pledge with
Keira’s church. His best friend, Qwan, is skeptical, but Del is in it for the
long game. He wants to be Keira’s boyfriend, even if it means acting like
something he really isn’t for a while. And to sweeten the deal, Del asks Keira’s
friend Jameer for a good word. But the other guys in school are circling her
like hungry sharks, and in all of Del’s scheming, he doesn’t stop to consider
if he’s doing the best thing, for the girl he loves and himself. What does it
really mean, to be a man?

               I
loved, loved, loved this book. I cannot properly express just how much I
enjoyed it.  Del’s voice was so honest,
thoughtful, and funny; I was immediately entranced by his voice. The pacing was
breakneck; I finished this book in a few short hours. I also adored the way
that Del, his friends and family talked honestly about sex, masculinity, love,
faith and other things that come with growing up. I was laughing, crying, and
cheering throughout the book. There were a few times I had to put it down and
walk away, because my brain was churning, or I was so angry that I was holding
back screams. But this book; it needs to be talked about, especially in the
current political climate. It asks essential questions that need to be spoken
about. This would be a great book for book clubs; it was contemporary, but it
was fresh, funny, honest and thoughtful. One of my favorites of 2020! The
bottom line: Tackling toxic masculinity, the patriarchy, and other essential
things, I loved Not So Pure and Simple! Next on deck: Dark and Deepest Red by
Anna-Marie McLemore!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/03/not-so-pure-and-simple-by-lamar-giles.html

Title: Salvaged

Author: Madeleine Roux

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Science Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               When I went to book club last month, before the coronavirus ground the world to a screeching halt, I was browsing and noticed this book sitting on the new display. I’ve been obsessed with Roux ever since I read her House of Furies series, so I took it home that night. I’ve been chilling at home, trying to work, read, watch TV; anything to take my mind off of how stressful my real life has become. Stay safe, all, practice social distancing and stay at home! But don’t forget fresh air. As soon as I finished Serpent and Dove, I dove into Salvaged; this book might be one of my most recent favorites. I’m a huge sucker for science fiction, but to call this book a sci-fi would be to lie. It was like science fiction and deep space, Alien-esque horror had a love child, and I absolutely loved it. This book may be my favorite in Roux’s entire body of work. I finished it in less than two days; it was nothing less than a masterpiece, and its characters will stay with me for a long time.

               Rosalyn ‘Roz’ Devar knows that her life is an absolute trainwreck; why else would she be stashed on a distant planet, working on an intergalactic janitorial detail? She’s an intelligent and prickly xenobiologist, running from a tumultuous past on Earth. But she receives one final chance to redeem herself: salvage the Brigantine, a vessel gone dark, her crew assumed dead. But when Rosalyn arrives at the ship, she finds the crew very much intact, if not entirely human. Rosalyn finds herself trapped on a dead ship, with a crew kept alive by an insidious, parasitic alien. The captain, Edison Aries, seems able to still control himself and his crewmates, but only just. Time is running out, and they may be the only thing standing in the way of Earth’s utter destruction…

               This book was such a cerebral, dry and layered surprise! It was completely different from anything else Roux has ever written. The pacing was breakneck, and one of my favorite parts of the book was Rosalyn’s dry, fractured narration. Deep space dread seeped into every word of the book, and there were several times I had to put it down and go back to it. It was so vivid and strange that it even slipped into my dreams. Dark, menacing, beautiful and thoughtful; this book will never leave me! It was also so human; I loved every single character all the more for their flaws. And the freaking villain of this novel; I’ll never look at fungi in the same way again! Madeleine Roux is one of my very favorite authors; this book was unique, dark, and wholly original! Easily one of my favorite books of all time! The bottom line: Dark, terrifying in more ways than one, thoughtful and human, I loved Salvaged! Next on deck: Not So Pure and Simple by Lamar Giles!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/03/salvaged-by-madeleine-roux-review.html

Title: Serpent and Dove

Author: Shelby Maruhin

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Fantasy

Series: Serpent and Dove, book one

Star Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I have a confession to make: I’ve had my eyes on this gorgeous, dark debut since before it came out. I’ve had to return this several times to the library before I got the chance to read it. Since I had no more renewals on the book, as soon as I was finished with P.S., I Still Love You, I dove in. This debut wasn’t perfect; the cast was so expansive it was near impossible to keep up, and some of the pacing and worldbuilding was shaky, but nonetheless, Maruhin has penned a dangerous, dark romance that had me laughing, crying, and swooning! I loved many things about this book, but the characters were my absolute favorite. This dark and delicious romance was fantastic; I loved the way the book went back and forth between Reid and Lou. Where magic and religion collide, Belterra is a dangerous place for religious soldiers and witches alike. Full of political intrigue, action, romance, and more than a few surprises, I can’t wait to read the sequel!

               In the land of Belterra, the church has taken over everything, and witches have gone into hiding to avoid being burned at the stake. Louise ‘Lou’ de Blanc has been on the run for days, trying desperately to hide from those who wish her bodily harm. She also has another secret: she is a witch, able to manipulate patterns around her to work magic. When she meets Reid Diggory, a soldier for the Church, called a Chassuer, Lou finds herself in a situation she cannot talk her way out of: The Archbishop orders that the couple be wed, and Lou reluctantly agrees. But there’s a fine line between love and hate, and Lou and Reid are about to see just how fine it can get…

               I very much enjoyed this book! There were a couple of little flaws, and I wish that the worldbuilding was explained better, but overall, this was a really strong debut! The pacing was breakneck, and I was immediately captivated by Lou’s sparkling and hilarious voice. I also loved the way the book went back and forth between she and Reid. Honestly, the Church in this book gave me the creeps, which I suppose was the point. I loved that in Belterra, religion and magic were constantly at odds. I also adored the romance between Lou and Reid; one of my favorite, classic tropes is enemies to lovers, and this book just knocked that part out of the park! I hope more information, particularly about the world, is revealed in the next book, but this book might be one of my favorites of the last year! Romantic, dark, chilling and surprising, I loved Serpent and Dove! Forbidden, hate-to-love romance is one of my favorite forms of literary catnip! The bottom line: Rich, hilarious, dark and delicious, I loved Serpent and Dove! Next on deck: Salvaged by Madeleine Roux!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/03/serpent-and-dove-by-shelby-maruhin.html

Title: P.S., I Still Love You

Author: Jenny Han

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Contemporary Fiction/Romance

Series: To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, book two

Star Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I desperately needed something light after finishing Long Bright River, and so I pushed P.S., I Still Love You to the top of my stack. I’ve been eager to catch up with the Song Covey girls since I finished To All the Boys, and I wanted an excuse to watch the sequel movie! I dove in immediately, and almost right away, I knew what was going on. P.S., I Still Love You picks up where To All the Boys left off: with Lara Jean and Peter, at long last, have become a real couple. But it’s not all sunshine and rainbows. After a risqué video surfaces of LJ and Peter online, she finds one of the most treasured moments of her life being dissected and torn apart by her classmates. Despite being fully in love with Peter K, she’s thrown for a loop once again when an old flame’s letter shows up in the mail. Lara Jean must decide, again, whether to follow her heart, wherever it may lead, even if it means disappointing the boy she loves most.

               I really, really liked this book! Sequels tend to make me nervous, as all too often, they don’t live up to the hype. But I had nothing to worry about here. Even though it’s been a few months since I’ve read To All the Boys, P.S., I Still Love You, I had no trouble remembering where things had left off. I was instantly charmed by Lara Jean’s hilarious and sweet narration. The pacing was nice; after Long Bright River, I devoured this book in a day and a half. I loved the Coveys, their whole family; I especially loved the way that their father was at the forefront of this novel! And of course, one of my favorite parts of this was the way it shone the spotlight on Lara Jean and her hilarious sisters. And oh, my gosh! The romance and drama in this book were practically killer! I was dying over it. And the oh, so sweet surprise of John Ambrose McClaren! The only part I didn’t like was the whole thing with Peter. Throughout this whole book, he was a complete jerk to LJ! I was a Peter K. fan, but now I’m leaning toward JAM. But I guess we’ll see what happens for our young lovers in Always and Forever, Lara Jean. I’m so excited, I can’t wait! The bottom line: Hilarious, heartbreaking, romantic and painful, I loved P.S., I Still Love You! Next on deck: Serpent and Dove by Shelby Maruhin!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/03/ps-i-still-love-you-by-jenny-han-review.html

Title: Long Bright River

Author: Liz Moore

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Mystery/Thriller

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I’ve been interested in Long Bright River before it officially came out, so when I reserved it at my local library, imagine my surprise when I was chosen to loan one of our library’s first copies! As soon as I was finished with Alien: Echo, I dove in. Taking place in Pennsylvania in the midst of the opioid crisis, Long Bright River tells the story of a police officer, Mickey, and her wayward younger sister, Kacey. Mickey is used to her sister disappearing; that’s nothing new. But when Kacey leaves a mysterious trail, Mickey is determined to find her sister, once and for all, to untangle the snarled threads that family secrets have left behind. But what Mickey uncovers goes far deeper, and she discovers that unearthing the past will hold a price that she may not be able to pay…

               Though this is Liz Moore’s third book, Long Bright River was the first I’ve ever read by her, and damn, talk about a doozy! Despite wanting something lighter after Alien, I pushed it up to the top of my stack, because I didn’t want to return it without reading it. This book is billed as a literary mystery thriller, but to sum up this meaty, heavy novel as only that would be to do it a major disservice. I’m from the Midwest, Ohio, specifically, and I’d be lying if I said this book didn’t hit really close to home. The opioid crisis is a huge deal, but especially here; I’ve seen more than one person I’ve known die from drug addiction. For that reason, I didn’t review right away; some books just need to marinate in your brain before you can write down your thoughts on it. At first, I didn’t know if the book would even be for me; I got one hundred pages in and wasn’t feeling it. But I decided to give it a chance, and I’m so, so happy that I did. The pacing was a little weird and took a bit for me to get used to, but once I did, I was thoroughly absorbed. Even if I didn’t have the book with me, it consumed my every thought. I was captivated by Mickey’s grave, quiet narration, and as I followed her through the Philly streets, the tension only grew. At times, there were so many characters that I had trouble keeping track. But overall, I loved this book, and I loved the fictional way that it laid out the awful and still climbing tolls taken by the crisis every day, particularly in my part of the country. I also loved the way that it called out the patriarchy (no spoilers!). Mickey, Kacey, Thomas, Simon, and Truman were all standout characters, so human and flawed that they seemed to come alive off of the page. And that ending! I had no idea it was coming, and when it did, I was so shocked I had to put the book down for a while! This book is one of the best I’ve read in 2020, and I can’t wait to see Liz Moore’s next novel! The bottom line: A rich, layered story about family, betrayal, and all kinds of secrets, I loved Long Bright River! Next on deck: P.S., I Still Love You by Jenny Han!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/03/long-bright-river-by-liz-moore-review.html

Title: Alien: Echo

Author: Mira Grant

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Science Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Mira Grant has piqued my interest for years, because it’s a pseudonym for bestselling author, Seanan McGuire, and I’ve had Alien: Echo sitting at the top of my stack for a few weeks. As soon as I was finished with The Downstairs Girl, I dove in. Something weird to know about me: I HATE horror movies in all forms, but I love them in books! Drawing on the classic Alien film series, Echo tells the story of the twin Shipp sisters, Olivia and Viola. Reluctantly following their parents across the galaxy to the planet Zagreus, all Olivia wants to do is woo a pretty girl from school. But the new colony has dark, fatal secrets, and it will take all of Olivia’s instincts, her parents’ knowledge of alien wildlife, floral and fauna, and more than one adaptation to survive the unknown threat that is working to take over the planet.

               This is the first book I’ve read under Seanan McGuire’s pseudonym, Mira Grant, and I’m happy to report that this will not be my last! I loved the way Grant took the strange but familiar world of Alien and made it her own. I love science fiction, it’s one of my favorite genres, but I love it even more when it’s mashed up with horror! The pacing was breakneck and I was immediately captivated by Olivia’s voice. The stark and terrifying planet of Zagreus will probably haunt my nightmares from now on. The sense of dread and terror only mounted as the book continued. I loved the entire Shipp family, but Olivia and Viola, as well as their bond, were my favorite part of the book. And that ending! I loved the way it ended. Having narration in the present tense only added to the terror! The only thing that bothered me was that at times Olivia seemed ruled by her hormones. Nonetheless, I very much enjoyed this book! Easily one of the best sci-fi novels I’ve read recently! The bottom line: Terrifying, dark, thoughtful and shocking, I loved Alien: Echo! Next on deck: Long Bright River by Liz Moore!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/03/alien-echo-by-mira-grant-review.html

Title: The Downstairs Girl

Author: Stacey Lee

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Historical Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Stacey Lee is one of my favorite authors; I’ve read all but one book she’s written. I read The Downstairs Girl as soon as it came out, so I was super excited when it was announced as our book club book for February. My friends asked me to reread it specifically so we could discuss it, so as soon as I was done with All the Bad Apples, I dove in again. This book might be my favorite in Lee’s entire body of work; I loved it so much! Telling the story of fierce, outspoken Jo Kuan, a half-Chinese, half-white young woman, this book was beautifully written and rife with detail. The research that Lee undertook was meticulous and extensive, and I loved the way she wrote post-Reconstruction Atlanta. Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres and this was a great reminder why!

               Jo Kuan may be half-Chinese, but she knows her worth, despite the whole of Atlanta not even viewing her, or the family she’s ever known, a man named Old Gin, as human beings. When she’s let go from her job as a milliner in a hat shop, at first, Jo despairs. She lives in the basement (literally) of a wealthy white family, and they’re the only reason Jo has something of an education. When their newspaper begins an agony aunt column, Jo decides to throw all caution to the winds and take the pseudonym of Miss Sweetie. But exposing herself, even anonymously, is a risk that could mean losing everything.

               I loved, loved, loved this book; it was just so wonderful, even reading it a second time. I loved Jo’s rich, honest and often hilarious voice. Her honesty and brashness were refreshing, especially when you consider what time period she lived in. The pacing was breakneck, and I also adored the way that each chapter started off with a Dear Sweetie letter. One of my favorite parts was how history was incorporated into the narrative; I really enjoyed the way that was integrated. The characters around Jo, too, were great in and of themselves: Caroline, Mr. and Mrs. Payne, Merritt, Nathan and his parents, Old Gin, Billy, and Noemi were all wonderful side characters! I loved how this book made me think, and the way that it shamelessly called out the poisonous, awful racism that still corrodes our society today. Easily one of my favorite books ever, I loved The Downstairs Girl! The bottom line: Hilarious, insightful, warm and topical, I loved The Downstairs Girl! Next on deck: Alien: Echo by Mira Grant!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/02/the-downstairs-girl-by-stacey-lee-review.html

Title: All the Bad Apples

Author: Moira Fowley-Doyle

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Moira Fowley-Doyle is one of my very favorite authors; I adored The Accident Season and I’ve been looking forward to All the Bad Apples ever since. I’ve had to return it to the library a few times before I could actually read it, but as soon as I was finished with Daughters Unto Devils, I dove in. This book is a tangled, sharp mystery that goes back and forth in time, telling the story of a family fractured by loss, rage, and tragic expectations. This book might be my favorite in Fowley-Doyle’s entire body of work; I loved the way that it took on the patriarchy and dismantled it, piece by piece and lie by lie. Lyrical, suspenseful, compassionate and tender, I loved the story of the cursed Rys family, and their complicated, secretive family tree. This book asks: How well do you know your loved ones and your family history? What secrets and skeletons hide in the closets and the shadows?

               Deena Rys, the family’s youngest daughter, is still reeling from the death of her older sister, Mandy, who the family suspects committed suicide. On top of that, everyone at her traditional Catholic Irish school knows that she’s gay. Forced to hide the truth about herself from her peers and her own family, something inside Deena tells her that Amanda is still alive. Her instincts are further proven correct when she finds a mysterious note from her sister, telling her that she has gone to the end of the world to break a curse that has haunted their family for generations. Deena is soon led on a dangerous journey through the past and present, seeking the truth that her family and her hometown have hidden for years. Will she discover the truth, or let the past stay buried?

               I really, really enjoyed this book! It might be my favorite in all of Fowley-Doyle’s work. The prose was lyrical, beautiful, and as brutal as the oceans surrounding Ireland. I was immediately captivated by Deena’s voice, stalwart and strong and refusing to take any flack for being the person she was meant to be. But the real focus of this novel was long buried secrets, hidden across time. This book was such a great call-out for toxic masculinity and rape culture, and I loved every painful moment of it. The pacing was a little staggered at first, but once I got the hang of it, I loved the way that the book went back and forth in time. The curse of the Rys family was also unique; one of my favorite traits of Fowley-Doyle is her ability to play with language and the sense of surrealism you get in her stories. I adored the way she brought traditional Irish mythology—fey, ancient curses, banshees—into the narrative. But my very favorite part was uncovering all the secrets of the Rys family, buried so deeply that they were almost invisible. I also loved the way that Fowley-Doyle spoke of the Catholic church, pious and kind on the outside but rotten to the core. I loved every character in this book, but Deena, Rachel, Mandy, Finn, Ida and Cale were among my favorites. And that ending! I loved it so much! The secrets of the Rys family were so numerous, at times I had to go back and reread some parts. Nonetheless, Moira Fowley-Doyle’s third novel might just be my favorite of them all! The bottom line: Shocking, dark, surprising and as tart and sweet as ripe apples, I loved All the Bad Apples! Next on deck: The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/02/all-bad-apples-by-moira-fowley-doyle.html

Title: Daughters Unto Devils

Author: Amy Lukavics

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Horror

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I’ve been a fan of Amy Lukavics for a long time now: We read Nightingale for one of the book clubs I go to, and a friend from there begged me to read The Women in the Walls so we could talk about it. I finished The Ravenous a little over a week ago, and when Amber and Dusk wasn’t working for me, I decided to push Daughters Unto Devils up to the top of my stack. I devoured this chilling, creepy book in less than a day, and I still can’t get the ending out of my mind. This book has been billed as Stephen King meets Little House on the Prairie, and I’d say that’s pretty accurate. Amy Lukavics has become one of my very favorite authors, and I’m in awe of her talent! I’m just bowled over by it.

               Amanda Verner knows that she’s a sinner, and she’s scarred by a traumatic event that happened the previous winter. After sleeping with the post boy who comes to the mountain periodically, she finds that her rash decision carries terrible consequences. Add to that disturbing visions, the wailing of her disabled baby sister, Hannah, and sounds outside, as well as the feeling she’s being watched, and she fears she’s losing her sanity. But Amanda soon discovers that even the land may be infected with an unshakable evil, and that her family is in mortal peril…

               I really enjoyed this book! I’m a huge fan of Lukavics already; I’ve read almost her entire body of work, but this one is one of my favorites. I never imagined that the vast, empty prairie could be terrifying, but this book changed my mind. Amanda’s voice was chilling, and the sense of dread and unease was so sickening at times that I had to put the book down to fully process it. I just finished it on Friday night, and I’m still haunted by it. The twists and turns, as well, were so intense that I felt like I was getting whiplash. But perhaps the most terrifying part of this book was Amanda’s family, and watching them all unravel, as well as the last, final nailbiting moments. That ending! I just closed the book and sat in the tub, numb with shock. This could be one of my favorites of hers; she’s for sure one of my favorite, to-die for authors! I hope I get to meet her someday! The bottom line: Dark, chilling, and as isolated as the prairie itself, Daughters Unto Devils was a fantastic horror novel! Absolutely unforgettable! Next on deck: All the Bad Apples by Moira Fowley-Doyle!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2020/02/daughters-unto-devils-by-amy-lukavics.html