Category: standalone

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Soci…

Title: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Authors: Mary Ann Schaffer and Annie Barrows

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Historical Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Okay, so, I’ll start this review out by being honest: I’ve been wanting to read this book for a long time, and when I realized that it was being made into a movie on Netflix, I jumped at the chance to read it. It’s been sitting in my library stack for a while, and as soon I was finished with A Room Away from the Wolves, I dove in, eager to see what all the fuss was about. I’m so happy that I read this book; it was, in turns, beautiful, funny, horrific and heartwarming. I loved every moment of it. This book may have been quick and short, but it has made indelible impressions upon my heart. And one of my favorite parts about it was the format: I haven’t read a book composed of letters in years! This novel, telling of the German Occupation of the tiny English island village of Guernsey, has become a recent favorite, and I cannot wait to watch the movie later this week. This book is nothing less than a triumph of the human soul in the face of unspeakable horror and bloodshed.

               The year is 1946, the beginning of the new year, and London is trying to leave behind the Second World War. Juliet Ashton, a young writer, is having trouble finding an idea for her new book. When she receives a letter from a man she’s never met, saying that he found her name in a secondhand book by Charles Lamb, Juliet is hit with inspiration and curiosity about the island of Guernsey and its residents. When she arrives, she is welcomed with open arms. Gathering stories of when German soldiers occupied the island, Juliet finds unexpected friends and perhaps even more. Buoyed by her new friendships and a group of book lovers, she finds new purpose in the most unexpected places.

               I absolutely adored this book! It’s definitely one of my more recent favorites. I’ve been wanting to read this book for a long time, and when the Netflix movie came out a few months ago, I jumped at the chance. This book was short, but it was bittersweet in the best kind of way. It was also told in letters, which I loved. I haven’t read an epistolary novel in years! The pacing was breakneck, and I was immediately spellbound by all the different voices that told the tale of the Guernsey island’s residents. I loved all of the characters, but Juliet was my favorite, because she was gentle, loving, caring and fiery, unapologetically herself. And the romance involved! It had me swooning. But I liked the juxtaposition between the hijinks of the villagers and the dark, horror-filled stories of the war. I loved this book so much, I only wish that the Guernsey Potato Peel Pie and Literary Society were real! But I have my book club friends, and that’s close enough! An absolute triumph of love, life, and the human spirit! The bottom line: Rich in detail and beautifully wrought, I loved this book! An absolute favorite! Next on deck: Queen of Ruin by Tracy Banghart!

You Must Not Miss by Katrina Leno Review

Title: You Must Not Miss

Author: Katrina Leno

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Horror

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Katrina Leno is one of my favorite authors, and I’ve been following her work ever since she wrote The Half-Life of Molly Pierce. I’ve been curious about You Must Not Miss since before I came out, and I was finally able to snatch it at my local library. As soon as I was finished with Under the Moon, I dove into this novel, not really knowing what to expect. This book was like a crazy fever dream that reminded me of Stephen King’s early work, like Carrie and several of his creepy, fantastical short stories. I loved every dark, scary moment, and this book is one of my favorites of Leno’s work, even though the ending seemed a little forced. Nonetheless, Leno has penned a book of darkness, dreams, rage and revenge, and the monsters that hide within us all.

               Margaret ‘Magpie’ Lewis once had the perfect life. A great best friend, a loving family and home. But that all unravels when she accidentally walks in on her father and aunt having sex. Her family, as a result, falls apart. Her mother becomes an alcoholic, her older sister, Eryn, leaves, unable to cope with her mother’s neglectful behavior, and Magpie loses everything. She is labeled a slut and quickly becomes a social pariah. Friendless, alone, and desperate for revenge, she begins to write in a notebook of a mysterious, magical place called Near. But when Magpie discovers that Near is actually real, a dark reflection of her town of Farther that she alone can control, she begins to realize that revenge is indeed possible. But once her world continues to spin out of control, Magpie must decide whether to give in to the monsters inside of her, or to begin the journey back into the light…

               I really loved this book; it might be my favorite in Leno’s entire body of work. Her prose is signature, dreamy and sparse and not altogether real. It was a book practically written with a scalpel. It made me want to rage, scream, and howl; I will never, ever forget Magpie or the dark, cruel trail of violence she leaves in her wake. The pacing was breakneck, and I was immediately spellbound by Magpie’s story, as ugly and awful and monstrous as it was. The transitions were also good; I liked the way the book flowed between the past and present, explaining the before and after of Magpie’s life. I also adored the way that Leno portrayed her; the way that she was so unapologetically wrathful. I could understand why Magpie felt that horrible, awful need for revenge; some wounds just require retribution. I liked the way that the book was written; it felt as if I was caught up in a compelling but terrifying nightmare. The only thing that I didn’t like was that the end, and Magpie’s bloody revenge, seemed really forced. But nonetheless, I really think that this book is my favorite of all of Leno’s books. I love stories about angry girls, and You Must Not Miss really fits the bill, despite its minor flaws. The bottom line: Dark, furious, and bloody, I loved You Must Not Miss! Easily Katrina Leno’s best novel, despite its flaws. Next on deck: Sky Without Stars by Jessica Brody and Ruth Rendell!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/07/you-must-not-miss-by-katrina-leno-review.html

Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune by Rose…

Title: Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune

Author: Roselle Lim

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               As soon as I was finished with Mrs. Everything, I pushed Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune to the top of my library stack. I tried reading Star-Crossed by Minnie Darke, and it was just flat, so I moved on. Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune was a tender, bittersweet tale of family, connection, food, and grief, and I loved every moment of it. I devoured this book in a mere matter of hours, I was so bewitched by it. Full of magic, new love, self-realization, and emotion, I loved this gorgeous, beautifully written debut. Roselle Lim is a fantastic author, and I cannot wait to see what she has up her sleeve next!

               Natalie Tan has been traveling abroad for several years, after a difficult, painful argument with her mother. When she receives news that her mother has passed away, she reluctantly returns to the neighborhood where she grew up. But when she arrives, she realizes that the vibrant, colorful neighborhood she remembers is dying. Neighbors are packing up and moving, bought off by an ambitious realtor. When Natalie receives a special cookbook passed down from the grandmother she never knew, she begins to realize her dream of opening her own restaurant. Spurred on by the bittersweet memories of her mother, she uses the recipes in her grandmother’s book to help her neighbors. But when things start to backfire, Natalie wonders whether to flee the neighborhood, her new friends, and a new spark of love, or to stay and do justice to her family’s legacy.

This book won my heart and made me cry; it was so soulful and emotional. I was instantly spellbound by Natalie’s frank, beautiful voice; the prose was hypnotic and so wonderful that I could almost feel the heat and smell the seasonings in Natalie’s kitchen. I love magical realism, and this book was a great reminder of that. I devoured this book in a mere matter of hours, less than a day. The pacing was snappy, and the characters in the book felt like new friends. The vibrant, gorgeous neighborhood that Natalie returns to was so real. Natalie, though, was my favorite, and I loved the way that Lim portrayed her relationship with her mother, as well as Chinese culture. This book made me laugh, cry, and squeal, in the best kind of way. Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune is one of my favorite novels of 2019. Yay for diverse books! There wasn’t a single thing about this book that I didn’t love; it was so good! The bottom line: Rich in detail, vibrant, tender and bittersweet, I loved Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune! Next on deck: Under the Moon: A Catwoman Tale by Lauren Myracle and Isaac Goodhart!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/07/natalie-tans-book-of-luck-and-fortune.html

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner Review

Title: Mrs. Everything

Author: Jennifer Weiner

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Historical Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Jennifer Weiner has long been one of my favorite authors; I read In Her Shoes and Little Earthquakes in college, and I haven’t looked back. Of her more recent work, I’ve read her essay collection, Hungry Heart. I reserved her newest book at my public library and was lucky enough to receive one of its first copies. It’s taken me a few days, but I finished it yesterday. One of my favorite things about Weiner’s writing is that it puts women, and their stories, front and center. Mrs. Everything tells the story of the Kaufman women, through multiple generations. It goes back and forth, from past and present, and the spotlight is on Bethie and Josette, Jo for short, primarily. And this book; it broke my heart and filled it all at once. Jennifer Weiner is one of my personal heroes, and Mrs. Everything made me hopeful for the future. Wry, wise, searing, and powerful, I loved it so much. It’s one of my favorite books of 2019.

               This book revolves around The Kaufmans, comfortably middle-class Jewish-American family, and the growth of its daughters. The pacing was snappy, the prose quick and sharp and compelling. The characters seemed so real that I could imagine them sitting around me, talking amongst themselves. I loved the way Weiner dealt with the issues that plague women from the 1950s, and up to now. This book should be required reading for everyone. I loved the characters in this book, as well as their journeys from children into adults. Jo and Bethie were my favorite, and their relationship with each other was what really made the book. This is Jennifer Weiner’s strength: to create vivid characters and mesh them beautifully. Jo’s daughters also made the book a standout; I love Weiner’s novels because they focus on family and friends. I loved this book because it made me laugh, cry, and rage. The Kaufman family got under my skin and into my heart in the best kind of way. Jennifer Weiner has penned another fantastic, heartfelt masterpiece. The bottom line: Rich with warmth, humor, and wisdom, I loved Mrs. Everything! Next on deck: Star-Crossed by Minnie Darke!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/07/mrs-everything-by-jennifer-weiner-review.html

Rough Magic by Lara Prior-Palmer Review

Title: Rough Magic: Riding in the World’s Loneliest Horserace

Author: Lara Palmer-Prior

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Nonfiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I’ve been trying to expand my literary horizons recently; after I read Bad Blood, I’ve been developing a taste for the nonfiction genre. I’d heard of Rough Magic before it came out, and it’s been sitting in my library stack for a while. I pushed it to the top of my stack right after I was finished with City of Girls. Lara Palmer-Prior’s frank, honest and compelling voice drew me in immediately; I was transfixed. I’ve loved horses since I was a little girl, and going back into that with this memoir felt like coming home. And honestly, I’m in awe of just the pure grit of this girl, entering one of the world’s most dangerous horse races, as an antidote for post-schooling restlessness. Vivid, hilarious, and inspiring, Rough Magic was a great book; I felt like I was transported to the colorful, stark landscape of the steppe she rides across. I finished this book a few days ago, and it took some time to gather my thoughts. But I will never forget Rough Magic, and I’m happy to tell you all that I’m growing fond of the nonfiction genre.

               Lara Prior-Palmer grew up around horses, as her mother and aunt are both passionate horsewomen. After graduating from college, she drifts aimlessly, uncertain of her purpose in life. On a lark, she enters a horse race that takes place halfway across the world, on the steppe of Mongolia, certain that she’s found her solution. Woefully unprepared and unsure of what to expect, Lara must tap deep into her inner strength in order to complete the race. Rough Magic chronicles the days before, during, and after the race. Honest, raw, funny, and wonderful, I was absolutely enchanted. Horses are one of my favorite animals, and it was so nice to read the experience of someone who loves them as much as I do. This book was, hands down, inspiring. I mean, to go across the whole of Mongolia on horseback? It really takes some guts to do something so daring. And honestly, I’m so happy with this book. I can’t wait to see more from Lara Prior-Palmer! I loved it, and it was so real that I kept getting thirsty, I imagined myself covered in sand and grit. This memoir is exemplary, and I can only hope that there’s more in store for this warrior of a woman! I can say with confidence that I will be reading whatever she writes next. The bottom line: Gritty, raw, and inspiring, I loved Rough Magic! What an amazing debut memoir! Next on deck: Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/07/rough-magic-by-lara-prior-palmer-review.html

City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert Review

Title: City of Girls

Author: Elizabeth Gilbert

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Historical Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I know of Elizabeth Gilbert the way most people do: post Eat, Pray, Love fame. I’ve read her self-help book, Big Magic, but before now, I haven’t read any of her prose offerings. Set in New York in 1940, City of Girls tells the story of Vivian Morris, sent to live with her Aunt Peg to live at The Lily Playhouse after leaving Vassar in disgrace. Once in the city, Vivian makes strange friends: a showgirl named Celia, her aunt’s boss, the serious and unflappable Olive, Peg’s impetuous, flighty ex-husband, Billy, and the most wonderful of all, an acclaimed actress that takes Vivian under her wing. Becoming the costume design for a brand-new play, Vivian, now at ninety-five years of age, recounts her life story to Angela, the daughter of a dear male friend. I have to say that this book is my favorite in Gilbert’s extensive body of work. Vivacious, funny, frank and strange, City of Girls is one of my favorite books of 2019, though it wasn’t perfect.

               It took a little while at first to get into this book; I wasn’t sure what to expect. But once the book got rolling, I was captivated. The pacing moved at a fast clip, and I loved bearing witness to Vivian’s coming of age. The cast of characters was dynamic and engaging, though I wish there had been a dramatis personae at the beginning; there were so many people spanning the novel that it was a little difficult to keep track of them all. New York City felt like a character in and of itself, and it seemed both welcoming and forbidding, all at once. The book follows Vivian through young adulthood, and catalogs her youthful mistakes, from getting kicked out of Vassar and finding refuge with her strange, drunk aunt to the bigger ones, ones that can’t be so easily excused by being young. I also adored the format, that Vivian was speaking straight to the reader. One of my favorite things about City of Girls was the love of theater, even its less glitzy aspects, and the way that Vivian led the reader through over forty years of American history. Gilbert’s latest work is honest, enchanting, electrifying, and I will never forget Vivian Morris, or her city. The bottom line: Gorgeous, funny, and tender, I loved City of Girls! Easily one of my favorite books of Elizabeth Gilbert’s! Next on deck: Rough Magic: Riding the World’s Loneliest Horse Race by Lara Prior-Palmer!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/07/city-of-girls-by-elizabeth-gilbert.html

Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston R…

Title: Red, White and Royal Blue

Author: Casey McQuiston

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Romance

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I
borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I’ve
been going through a lot of personal stuff right now, and so, I’ve been craving
romances and stories with happy endings. I don’t normally read romance, but with
this book, that has since changed. I was reminded of just how much I love the
genre. Red, White, and Royal Blue has become one of my favorite books of 2019;
it was a romance that was nuanced, hilarious, sexy, and tender, all at once. I
loved it; Casey McQuiston is a shining new talent in fiction. This modern, gay
fairy tale swept me off of my feet and stole my heart within the first chapter.
I was rooting for Alex and Henry through the whole thing, and I finished this
afternoon. I haven’t been able to stop smiling. This book was as delicious and
satisfying as a home-cooked meal, and I loved every moment of it. I’m glad I
started my journey into the romance genre with this excellently written book.
Enemies to lovers is one of my favorite romance tropes, and this book showcases
it fantastically.

               Red,
White and Royal Blue starts in the way that many romances do: two smart, sexy
main characters, a rivalry, and explosive, engaging chemistry. Alex-Claremont
Diaz is the First Son of the United States, the only son of Madam President and
her senator ex-husband, and he hates Prince Henry of Wales, who he thinks is
snobby, rude, and prudish. When an international incident occurs due to their mutual
dislike, the two young men are forced to feign friendship. But sparks fly as
they begin to understand each other, but it’s not exactly up to them to make
the decision. Will our two knuckleheads find love, in spite of the forces
rising against them?

               This
book was such a treat! I was immediately engaged in the story, the pacing was
nice, and the pages practically crackled with energy and chemistry. I loved McQuiston’s
writing style, wry and funny and totally unique. The premise certainly wouldn’t
happen in real life, but it’s not formulaic or unoriginal. I loved every
escapist moment of it. The characters were so great I was constantly laughing
or swooning! I adored Alex and Henry, as well as the characters around them:
Zahra, Cash, June, Nora, and their respective parents. This book was a real
breath of fresh air, and I’m very sad that I don’t have this book in my
collection. The love story was what really got me though; that was my favorite
part. Watching two people fall in love is such a magical, happy thing, and Casey
McQuiston knocked this element out of the park. I’m so very happy with this
book; I came away from it happy, diverted from my worries, if only for a little
while. And isn’t that all we can ask from anything we read, but especially
fiction? The bottom line: Sexy, sweet, and funny, I loved Red, White and Royal
Blue! Easily one of my favorite books of 2019! Next on deck: City of Girls by Elizabeth
Gilbert!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/06/red-white-and-royal-blue-by-casey.html

With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo Rev…

Title: With the Fire on High

Author: Elizabeth Acevedo

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Elizabeth Acevedo’s work has been on my radar since her debut verse novel, The Poet X, came out. Unfortunately, I was not able to read it before it went back to my local library. When I heard that she had a sophomore novel coming out in May, I put it on hold, and I was lucky enough to receive my library’s first copy! It’s been sitting in my stack for a while, and once I realized I couldn’t renew it anymore, I pushed it up to the top right after Finale. With the Fire on High did not disappoint; it’s one of my favorite books of 2019. Fresh, honest, endearing and sweet and full of unique flavor, I will never forget Emoni Santiago and her journey. Acevedo has cemented her place as one of my favorite authors with this prose novel.

               Emoni Santiago is the girl that all the parents warn their kids away from, because she got pregnant with her daughter her freshman year of high school. But she doesn’t let that bother her, because she’s got Babygirl, her beloved grandmother, Buela, and her passion: cooking. But Emoni has a lot on her plate: dealing with Emma’s father, Tyrone and his parents, who never approved of her, becoming reluctant friends with a new student named Malachi, and her fierce desire to become a renowned chef, worrying about Buela and her college applications, her semi-absent father. When the opportunity to go to Spain arises with the culinary arts class elective, Emoni jumps at the chance, despite knowing that she may not be able to go. But how will she juggle all of her responsibilities and the dreams she longs for so desperately?

               I loved, loved, loved this book! It was amazing! Teen moms need more of a spotlight in literature in general, and Acevedo did a fantastic job with Emoni Santiago. I was instantly captivated by her vibrant, honest, and hilarious voice. Also, diverse books for the win! The pacing was breakneck, and I was rooting for her the whole way through the book. It felt like I was talking to a friend, and I ended the book feeling happy and sad all at the same time, because that’s what Enomi became for me. The characters around her helped emphasize her: Babygirl, Tyrone and his parents, Buela, Julio, and Angelica. Emoni’s budding friendship with Malachi was one of my favorite parts of the book. I also adored her relationships with Emma and her loving grandmother. She was fierce and tender, determined, sassy and sweet. I loved her, and her character development was excellent. Elizabeth Acevedo has recently become one of my favorite writers with With the Fire on High, and I am just floored (in the best way) by her talent. The bottom line: Delicious, sweet, and savory, I loved Elizabeth Acevedo’s sophomore novel and first prose offering; I will never forget Emoni Santiago! Next on deck: Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/06/with-fire-on-high-by-elizabeth-acevedo.html

Save Me the Plums by Ruth Reichl Review

Title: Save Me the Plums: My Gourmet Memoir

Author: Ruth Reichl

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Nonfiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

               I
borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               I’ve
always been a great fan of Ruth Reichl, from watching her on food shows such as
Top Chef and reading her restaurant reviews in The New York Times. I’ve been curious
about her other books of food writing, so when I heard about Save Me the Plums
on Instagram, I reserved it at my local library. It’s been sitting on the top of
my stack for a while now, and I wanted to make sure I was able to review it
before I had to return it. This wry, honest and sidesplitting memoir had me
laughing, gasping, and crying as I followed her journey to become the manager
of the now defunct Gourmet magazine. I very much enjoyed it, though I was
hoping that the focus would be more on the food. However, it’s definitely got
me curious about the rest of Riechl’s extensive body of work, as well as food
writing and nonfiction in general. It also makes me sad that I didn’t realize
Gourmet’s existence before it went under.

               Ruth
Reichl, in essence, is a writer. That’s how she’s made her living for a number
of years, so she was, to say the least, surprised when she was approached to
take over a classic food magazine, Gourmet. Which also inspired her to plunge
into the world of food and food writing, not unironically. Feeling intimidated and
completely out of her depth, she decides to go for it anyway, eager for an
opportunity to try something new and be closer to her family for the first time
in years. Hilarity ensues, and so does innovation: Reichl publishes the controversial
David Foster Wallace article about boiling lobsters alive, and more besides. Seeing
the magazine through many changes, I really feel that the magazine, classic,
was really in its modern heyday when she was heading the charge. This book was
thoughtful, entertaining, tender and surprisingly funny; I’d really like to explore
more of her work. As I said, I’d really liked it if more food was involved, but
it was very good! I’m happy I read it, and I’m really looking forward to
reading more of Ruth Reichl and food writing in general. The bottom line:
Hilarious and grim, thoughtful and entertaining, I loved Save Me the Plums!
Next on deck: The Boy Next Story by Tiffany Schmidt!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/06/save-me-plums-by-ruth-reichl-review.html

Girl Gone Viral by Arvin Ahmadi Review

Title: Girl Gone Viral

Author: Arvin Ahmadi

Age Group: Teen/Young Adult

Genre: Science Fiction

Series: Standalone

Star Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

               I
borrowed this book from my local library and reviewed it.

               Arvin
Ahmadi won my heart completely last year, when one of the book clubs I go to
chose his debut novel, Down and Across. I loved it so much; it was one of my
favorite books of 2018. So, when I found out that he was writing a sophomore
novel, I was so excited that I ordered it from my local library. It’s been
sitting on the top of my stack for a while, so as soon as I was finished with
Love a la Mode, I got started. Arvin Ahmadi leads the reader through a
fantastic, twisted world where technology rules all, and the darkest secrets
hide behind a glossy, shiny façade. But even more than that, he brings up important
questions: When will technology and innovation take over our society and, essentially,
replace the experiences that form our reality? It’s quite possible that I love
this book even more than Down and Across. Thought-provoking, dark, and more
than a bit terrifying, I loved every tense, mysterious moment of it, and I will
never forget Opal Hopper and her friends!

               Opal
Hopper is a girl who is broken into pieces. Devastated by her father’s disappearance
five years ago, she has retreated into the immersive world of VR, becoming a
tech-savvy hacker to capture Howie Mendelsohn’s attention, the owner and CEO of
Wave, who, she is convinced, has the answers to why her father left their
family. Desperate for the truth, Opal throws all caution to the wind and begins
a channel that forces viewers to face the real truth. But her desire for the
truth leads her to follow a dark, twisting path that exposes the dark
underbelly of her world, and she and her friends may not be able to weather the
fallout…

               This
book was wonderful! Told with Ahmadi’s signature wry tone, I was immediately
captivated by Opal’s voice, and her desperate need to discover why her father
left her and her mother. The pacing was breakneck; I devoured this book in a
little over a day. It was dark, thoughtful, and more than a little terrifying.
It got me really thinking about the dark side of social media and technology.
In our desire to be seen, to be heard, how much of our true selves are we
sacrificing? I love, love, love books that make me think, and Ahmadi has
absolutely outdone himself with his second novel. Though Opal was the main
star, I also loved the other characters, and the world they lived in. I also
adored the journey that Opal took to the dark underbelly of her world, and the
way that she was undaunted and dogged in her quest for the truth. I really felt
like I couldn’t trust anyone in this book, perhaps not even Opal herself. And
that ending! Oh, my goodness, it knocked my socks off and felt like the most
brutal, awful punch to the stomach, in the best way! Arvin Ahmadi has cemented
his place as one of my favorite authors with Girl Gone Viral, and I can’t wait
for more from him! The bottom line: Dark, visceral, truly frightening and
thought-provoking, I loved Girl Gone Viral! Next on deck: Save Me the Plums: My
Gourmet Memoir by Ruth Reichl!

https://literatureobsessed.blogspot.com/2019/06/girl-gone-viral-by-arvin-ahmadi-review.html